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What if there was a royal commission into accounting?

Posted by Matt Connor on 12 July 2018
What if there was a royal commission into accounting?

The banking royal commission has all but been and gone, but it's left us wondering what would happen if there was a royal commission into accountants?

Great accountants operate 100% in their clients' best interests, through a pure fee-for-service model, meaning they only charge and get paid for services that their clients actually need.

As with any industry, however, not all accountants are created equal, so If there was to be a an accounting royal commission, one of the major issues I believe would be in the spotlight is unnecessary complexity.

Complexity for complexity's sake

Where accountants would potentially come unstuck in a royal commission is for advising and servicing complex and unnecessary business and investment structures. Generally speaking, the more complexity involved, the more money that can be charged to manage it, so it makes sense that this is an area that's open to manipulation.

If you're dealing with an accountant that's not on the up and up, and are out to increase their bottom line at any cost, you could be the victim of being sold over-complicated and unnecessarily involved setups that you don't need.

Less is more

The starting point for any accountant should be to act in their clients' best interests at all times, however, further to this, it should ultimately be a focus to steer clients towards the simplest option available to them.

This isn't always easy.

The psychology of complexity is interesting - some people are sceptical of solutions that are too simple, often demanding the solution with all the bells and whistles, even when a simpler (and cheaper) solution will achieve the same result.

Trust is everything

It's critical that you can rely on your accountant to give you honest, impartial advice when it comes to your finances, and not put you into arrangements that are costly to administer and provide no added value.

Bottom line is, if your accountant is telling you you don't need to spend more money on a more complicated solution, you should listen!

Look before you leap

Before you get yourself locked in to a large, complex accounting structure, it's important to make sure you're working with an accountant that understands the value of simplicity and is most interested in offering you the least complicated proposal there is, with the best return.

Take the time to make sure you're comfortable with any proposed course of action before you get started. It can take a number of years and cost significant sums in tax to undo overly complex arrangements, and, often, structures that hold a large asset or business can cost more to unravel than it would cost to simply keep going until you're ready to exit, accountants fees and all.

So, if you find yourself in a complex setup and you're not sure of the benefits, ask your accountant why they've advised the strategy detailed in their proposal.

Better to take your time to scope out your requirements before you set up than race into a new structure that might hurt you in the long run.

Get in touch to learn more and find out how we can help you with your accounting needs.

Author: Matt Connor
Tags: Tax

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